Even Calls

by 302 Acid

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about

Reissue of the 2005 em:t records release

The original mix for CD is seamless, meant to be listened to straight through without interruption.
The tunes have been provided here individually, however we recommend listening fully, in order, to experience the artists original intent.

“You canʼt help but admire the emotion of it all... this is stunning.”
Future Music

“...probably one of the most original releases of this year ʻ05, ranging from different influences such as deep cinematic ambient,
electronica, jazz structures, classical and even progressive post-rock.”
Revolve Magazine

If the name 302 Acid suggests an unhealthy interest in the sound of a certain legendary Roland bass station, then forget you ever heard it.
As it appears on this their debut album, thereʼs nothing minimalist or retro about the music of this Washington DC trio. Even Calls is an
almost continuous swathe of densely arranged sound, multi layered and amniotically appealing. The swelling, substaining tones of Douglas
Kallmayerʼs electric double bass – sometimes bowed, sometimes plucked, always heavily treated – underpin most of these pieces. This
unstinting flow of low-frequency tones serves as a rich, loamy subsoil in which the rest of the music takes root. Itʼs clear from the many
twists and turns that live improvisation is as important as programming for 302 Acid; a piece like ʻRoad Trip to Tokyoʼ incorporates lovingly
nuanced percussion – all rimshots and lithe, darting hit hat fills – into a rising tide of sweetly distressed white noise. And itʼs a finely calibrated
dub sensibility that holds everything in place, a tuned understanding of when to drop the fader and let some space into the mix – ʻMortariggusʼ
is a spacious interlude that offers hovering, Frippertronic drones and suggesting distant cavernous spaces with economic poise. It swings
without pause into the hustling forward drive of ʻPush Buttonʼ, and multitudinous clouds of sound gather again.
– Chris Sharp, The Wire- Adventures in Modern Music

credits

released July 11, 2017

Justin Mader- electronics
Andrew Reichel- electronics
Dempsey Hamilton- percussion
Doug Kallmeyer- bass, electronics

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